The Hate That Hate Produced By Mike Wallace

This is an old documentary by Mike Wallace about Black Nationalism, made in 1959, before America became politically correct in a pathological sense. It deals mainly with the black-supremacist Nation of Islam, the largest Black Nationalist sect, but also with other groups. Black Liberation Theology of Obama’s sect in Chicago was canonized in the late 1960’s. The foundation books were written by a college professor and it appeals for that reason to black urban professionals, like Obama, but if you study the theology and compare to the scripture of the Nation of Islam, it is easy to recognize that the two doctrines are closely related. The founder of Back Liberation Theology, James H. Cone, said that he combined the beliefs of Malcolm X, a member of the Nation of Islam, and Martin Luther King, Jr. It is clear, however, that the central tenets, come from Malcolm X and not the non-violent, more traditional Christianity of Martin Luther King.

The Nation of Islam is not orthodox Islam, but a cult-like, black sect. It could be considered to be a racist off-shoot of the Jehovah’s Witnesses that was influenced by Gnostic groups, such as Freemasonry and related groups. The Islamic motif comes actually from the Shriner’s, a group that is associated with Freemasonry. The Nation of Islam has always used the Bible more than they rely on the Koran. There doctrine is based mainly on the apocalyptic books of Daniel, Ezekiel and Revelation.

The documentary deals mainly with the black-supremacist Nation of Islam, the largest Black Nationalist sect, but also with other groups. Black Liberation Theology of Obama’s sect in Chicago was canonized in the late 1960’s. The foundation books were written by a college professor and it appeals for that reason to black urban professionals, like Obama, but if you study the theology and compare to the scripture of the Nation of Islam, it is easy to recognize that the two doctrines are closely related. The founder of Back Liberation Theology, James H. Cone, said that he combined the beliefs of Malcolm X, a member of the Nation of Islam, and Martin Luther King, Jr. It is clear, however, that the central tenets, come from Malcolm X and not the non-violent, more traditional Christianity of Martin Luther King.

The story on the Internet is that the head of the Nation of Islam, then Elijah Muhammad, called a meeting of a few dozen black ministers. A few weeks later a full-page ad was taken out in the New York Times that announced a new more aggressive, black version of Christianity would be developed. A couple of years later, James H. Cone published his first book on Black Liberation Theology, entitled “Black Theology and Black Power.” The doctrine of Black Liberation Theology is also black supremacist and similar to a pseudo-Christian version of racist, Gnostic doctrine of the Nation of Islam.


Why label Obama Marxist/Communist?

Branding Obama a “Marxist” or a “Communist” is just not an effective charge. Many on the left side of the political spectrum think that being socialist or even a Marxist is perfectly acceptable and a good thing. For that reason, accusing Obama of being a Marxist, does not impact his base support much, or even that of those more in the middle. Also, it is not clearly documented anywhere that he is a Marxist or Communist.

However, the doctrine of his church is black nationalist and is very well-documented in the foundation books on Black Liberation Theology by James H. Cone. Obama’s self-described spiritual guide, Jeremiah Wright, said in a national television interview that Black Liberation Theology is the doctrine of their “church.” It is fundamentally based on racism and sedition, equating white society to the Antichrist and holding that the black race is the manifestation of God on earth and has a divine mission to destroy America and the white race. It is socialistic in that it calls for wealth redistribution by means of destruction of the current democratic system. Black Nationalists have often worked with communists, because they have a common goals of destruction of the American democratic system and so-called world liberation.

Marxism is not the only socialistic ideology and Marxism/communism is not based on racist or on religious belief. Black Liberation Theology is religious belief — though it is definitely not Christianity as most people know it — and it is fundamentally based on racism and hatred of the American system and white society.

The truth is that Obama mixes the characteristics of a number of different religious sects and quasi-religious ideologies. To be exclusive about labeling him one thing or the other can be counter-productive, because the argument becomes about whether that one characterization is correct. Name-calling can be effective, but do not be limited to one classification and do not let the argument be limited to one definition about whether he is a communist, a black Nazi, and Islamist an anarchist or whatever, because his radicalism has a lot of different aspects and he will work with a lot of different extremist groups to achieve his goal, the downfall of America as we have known it.

Racism and sedition should not be acceptable on either side of the political spectrum in a president and the public ought to demand that he resign, due just to his racist religious background, which has been charged in the conservative media (such as by Sean Hannity), but never fully explained in depth and detail with much accuracy.

Obama's spritual guide, J. Wright.

Bringing out that his religion is racist breaks a couple of taboos against publicly criticizing a religion, especially that of a black man as being racist. However, it should be done on a large scale to put his supporters on the defensive for a change and make them explain why we should have a president, whose religion has been for 20 years that white society is the “Antichrist” and America the demonic tool of the Antichrist and the root of evil in the world.

Conservatives, as well as others with any sense of fairness at all, ought to be outraged by this. We should not be required to read his mind to find out whether he really believes this crackpot, racist doctrine, or not. It is also not about whether he can actually carry out the destruction of America and the white race as this pathological and perverse cult-like religious doctrine prophesies will be led by a “black messiah.” It’s about him being in such a racist religious sect in the first place, which is outrageous and unacceptable for a president. The media, even the conservative media such as Fox News, has never fully explained Obama’s racist religion to the public and that is outrageous.

If you have any doubt about this, you can buy the books by James H. Cone from Amazon and decide for yourself. Click the link below for dozens of quotes from Cone’s first two books.

Some excerpts from Cone’s books on Black Liberation Theology

Because a person presents a disarming and pleasant public demeanor, does not necessarily mean that he harbors no racial animosity or bigotry for certain ethnic or social groups. David Duke and Georg Haider proved that racism can be hidden behind a pleasant demeanor. It is reasonable and you are perfectly entitled to assume that anyone, who belongs to such a racist sect for 20 years, understands the doctrine and is an adherent of it. Obama should be called to account for it, but he never was by the media or opposition politicians, who should have investigated this and explained it. It is still not too late for the public to insist that he be held responsible for it. His political agenda, seems to be very much in line with the racist version of “social justice” described in the doctrine of Black Liberation Theology, which holds that America is responsible for the oppression of non-white peoples and must, for that reason, be destroyed, in order to end oppression and to create a world Utopia. Obama should be openly challenged on these points.

Obama Explains Benefit of Racial Hatred of Whites

Obama Justifies Black Racism

In this excerpt below from his book “Dreams from my Father” (page 196 of the paperback edition) Obama explains how racial hatred and scapegoating of whites can provide a beneficial effect for blacks. Such racism and scapegoating is used by black nationalist and Afrocentric groups, such as the Nation of Islam, the New Black Panther Party and his own church, Trinity United Church of Christ of Chicago. Obama is describing a time that was before he joined Jeremiah Wright’s Trinity church. So, it shows that Obama was well-aware of the racial hatred of such groups, before he even met Jeremiah Wright. His conclusion is that such racism may be a necessary evil to improve the condition of the black race.

The same kind of “therapy” also produced a great improvement in the self-esteem of many Germans in the 1930’s and 1940’s. It is a proven technique! Though Obama claims that he does not personally feel good about such racial hatred, one has to take into account that he has a political career to protect. He could hardly say outright that he approves of racism without harming his career. However, he did join Wright’s church, which has a black nationalist doctrine, based on racial hatred and extreme anti-Americanism. Actions speak louder than words.

Obama demonstrates his general familiarity with the racist doctrine of black nationalism by discussing the finer details of the racism contained in the autobiography of Malcolm X and quoting Marcus Garvey, the father of the modern black nationalist mass movement. One of Garvey’s famous quotes, which Obama uses is a call for the black race to rise, “Rise up ye mighty race!” From reading other parts of this book, it is very obvious that Obama understood quite well the basic racist tenets of Black Nationalism at least since he was a teenager in Hawaii. This is to be expected, because he is not unintelligent and was very interested in exploring his black identity. He was fascinated and preoccupied with all things having to do with black culture, including black nationalism. The entire book is about his search since childhood for racial identity.

The doctrine of Trinity Church is based on Black Liberation Theology, which is a more sophisticated, pseudo-Christian version of the black identity theology of the Nation of Islam. Black Liberation Theology was written by a black professor in a seminary, James H. Cone. It is somewhat less direct in its racism and seems designed to be more socially acceptable in order to spread the racist concepts and extreme anti-American bigotry of the Nation of Islam among black urban professionals and black churches.

The theology of the NOI is not orthodox Islam but is branch of a wider black identity cult movement, whose various branches present a facade as Judaism, Islamic or Christian. They are really none of these religions, but closely-related black sects, based on a common, similar Gnostic doctrine, which all hold the black race to be the chosen people or actually God and the white race to be the ultimate evil or the devil.

When an author wants to express a controversial view in a book, but not have it blamed on himself, sometimes he will use a third party to state what they want to say. Rafiq, in this excerpt that follows, has never been identified with a real person and some people think that he is just a literary construct by Obama, which allows him to discuss the racism of Black Nationalism, while attempting to maintain some personal distance for himself. Obama writes in his analysis below that he does not feel good about it, but that racism may be necessary to improve the condition of the black race. This is the wrong conclusion! — especially, for a president of the United States!

When the two of us were alone, though, Rafiq and I could sometimes have normal conversations. Over time I arrived at a grudging admiration for his tenacity and bravado, and, within his own terms, a certain sincerity He confirmed that he had been a gang leader growing up in Altgeld; he had found religion, he said, under the stewardship of a local Muslim leader unaffiliated with Minister Louis Farrakhan’s Nation of Islam. “If it hadn’t been for Islam, man, I’d probably be dead,” he told me one day. “Just had a negative attitude, you understand. Growing up in Altgeld, I’d soaked up all the poison the white man feeds us. See, the folks you’re working with got the same problem, even though they don’t realize it yet. They spend half they lives worrying about what white folks think. Start blaming themselves for the shit they see every day, thinking they can’t do no better till the white man decides they all right. But deep down they know that ain’t right. They know what this country has done to their momma, their daddy, their sister. So the truth is they hate white folks, but they can’t admit it to themselves. Keep it all bottled up, fighting themselves. Waste a lot of energy that way.

“I tell you one thing I admire about white folks,” he continued. “They know who they are. Look at the Italians. They didn’t care about the American flag and all that when they got here. First thing they did is put together the Mafia to make sure their interests were met. The Irish—they took over the city hall and found their boys jobs. The Jews, same thing . . .you telling me they care more about some black kid in the South Side than they do ’bout they relatives in Israel? Shit. It’s about blood, Barack, looking after your own. Period. Black people the only ones stupid enough to worry about their enemies.”

That was the truth as Rafiq saw it, and he didn’t waste energy picking that truth apart. His was a Hobbesian world where distrust was a given and loyalties extended from family to mosque to the black race — whereupon notions of loyalty ceased to apply. This narrowing vision, of blood and tribe, had provided him with a clarity of sorts, a means of focusing his attention. Black self-respect had delivered the mayor’s seat, he could argue, lust as black self-respect turned around the lives of drug addicts under the tutelage of the Muslims. Progress was within our grasp so long as we didn’t betray ourselves.

But what exactly constituted betrayal? Ever since the first time I’d picked up Malcolm X’s autobiography, I had tried to untangle the twin strands of black nationalism, arguing that nationalism’s affirming message-—of solidarity and self-reliance, discipline and communal responsibility—need not depend on hatred of whites any more than it depended on white munificence. We could tell this country where it was wrong, I would tell myself and any black friends who would listen, without ceasing to believe in its capacity for change.

In talking to self-professed nationalists like Rafiq, though, I came to see how the blanket indictment of everything white served a central function in their message of uplift; how, psychologically, at least, one depended on the other. For when the nationalist spoke of a reawakening of values as the only solution to black poverty, he was expressing an implicit, if not explicit, criticism to black listeners: that we did not have to live as we did. And while there were those who could take such an unadorned message and use it to hew out a new life for themselves—those with the stolid dispositions that Booker T Washington had once demanded from his followers—in the ears of many blacks such talk smacked of the explanations that whites had always offered for black poverty: that we continued to suffer from, if not genetic inferiority, then cultural weakness. It was a message that ignored causality or fault, a message outside history, without a script or plot that might insist on progression. For a people already stripped of their history, a people often ill-equipped to retrieve that history in any form other than what fluttered across the television screen, the testimony of what we saw every day seemed only to confirm our worst suspicions about ourselves.

Nationalism provided that history, an unambiguous morality tale that was easily communicated and easily grasped. A steady attack on the white race, the constant recitation of black people’s brutal experience in this country, served as the ballast that could prevent the ideas of personal and communal responsibility from tipping into an ocean of despair. Yes, the nationalist would say, whites are responsible for your sorry state, not any inherent flaws in you. In fact, whites are so heartless and devious that we can no longer expect anything from them. The self-loathing you feel, what keeps you drinking or thieving, is planted by them. Rid them from your mind and find your true power liberated. Rise up, ye mighty race!

This process of displacement, this means of engaging in self-criticism while removing ourselves from the object of criticism, helped explain the much-admired success of the Nation of Islam in turning around the lives of drug addicts and criminals. But if it was especially well suited to those at the bottom rungs of American life, it also spoke to all the continuing doubts of the lawyer who had run hard for the gold ring yet still experienced the awkward silence when walking into the clubhouse; those young college students who warily measured the distance between them and life on Chicago’s mean streets, with the danger that distance implied; all the black people who, it turned out, shared with me a voice that whispered inside them-“You don’t really belong here.”

In a sense, then, Rafiq was right when he insisted that, deep down, all blacks were potential nationalists. The anger was there, bottled up and often turned inward. And as I thought about Ruby and her blue eyes, the teenagers calling each other “nigger” and worse, I wondered whether, for now at least, Rafiq wasn’t also right in preferring that that anger be redirected; whether a black politics that suppressed rage toward whites generally, or one that failed to elevate race loyalty above all else, was a politics inadequate to the task.

It was a painful thought to consider, as painful now as it had been years ago. It contradicted the morality my mother had taught me, a morality of subtle distinctions between individuals of goodwill and those who wished me ill, between active malice and ignorance or indifference. I had a personal stake in that moral framework; I’d discovered that I couldn’t escape it if I tried. And yet perhaps it was a framework that blacks in this country could no longer afford; perhaps it weakened black resolve, encouraged confusion within the ranks.

Desperate times called for desperate measures, and for many blacks, times were chronically desperate. If nationalism could create a strong and effective insularity, deliver on its promise of self-respect, then the hurt it might cause well-meaning whites, or the inner turmoil it caused people like me, would be of little consequence.

Is Obama Muslim?

Elijah Muhammad, Prophet of the Nation of Islam, taught that blacks are born muslims. Cosmic symbols on his fez signify that the black man is the master of the universe.
Obama might be termed an ethnic Muslim or cultural Muslim, because he embraces his father’s family with is a traditionally Muslim family. His documented religion is, however, the Black Liberation Theology of Jeremiah Wright’s Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago.

The doctrine of the so-called church where Obama was a member for 20 years is not Christianity, but has a kind of Gnostic doctrine and was inspired by the Nation of Islam. The Nation of Islam is not orthodox Islam either, but also has a Gnostic, black cult doctrine. The NOI was started by a group of not very educated men and the head, Elijah Muhammad, used to fret that they needed professional types to build a “black nation.”

Black Liberation Theology can be seen as a pseudo-Christian version of the Nation of Islam. It has a doctrine written by a professor that appeals more to black urban professionals, like Obama, and has also been useful for spreading the concepts of the NOI into black churches and the general, black population.

Elijah Muhammad taught that his version of Islam is not a religion, but that blacks are naturally born Muslims. They have a Nazi-like concept that all culture and knowledge come from the black man, the “original people.” The sects that are based on the Elijah Muhammad’s Black Nationalism borrow a lot of concepts from his writings, which are considered to be scripture by his followers. Obama may feel that he is, at root, a Muslim, in the sense of Elijah Muhammad.

Obama campaign poster with radiant halo, similar to that used in images of Elijah Muhammad.
Obama is certainly very sympathetic to Islam, due to his family background and the connection of his Gnostic pseudo-church to the Nation of Islam cult. Black Liberation Theology is compatible with Islam in its ethics, justifying whatever is necessary to destroy the white man and to bring down America. He is also anxious to cooperate with Muslims to achieve his anti-American agenda. The doctrine of his pseudo-church is worse than that of Islam in any case, calling more specifically for the destruction of America and white society by any means necessary. People should take the time to read the foundation books on Black Liberation Theology by James H. Cone, available from Amazon. They are short, inexpensive books that give you a much better idea of the religious nature of Obama’s agenda against America, whites and the orthodox Christian church. It holds that all three must be destroyed in order to bring on the millennial utopia or kingdom of God on Earth, which in their doctrine will be a physical theocracy led by a black messiah. The doctrine teaches that the black messiah will be an ordinary man who exalts himself to that god-like status, by struggle against white society. Because they are self-exalted, more than one messiah is possible at the same time.

Louis Farrakhan, the current head of the Nation of Islam, who was a disciple of Elijah Muhammad, implied during the campaign (Feb., 2008) at his “Saviors’ Day Conference” that Obama is a black messiah. Note that “Saviors’ ” is plural on Farrakhan’s podium in the clip below. The black vote shifted from Hillary to Obama at about that time, just as Michelle Obama had predicted about three months earlier in an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” program.

Louis Farrakhan Hails Obama As The Black Messiah